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Deaf and World War II: General Databases

Find resources related to Deaf People during the WW II years.
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Finding Resources Using Summon

The Summon search box is the orange search box located on the RIT Libraries' homepage.  Summon allows you to search almost all of the library's content from a single search box  similar to a Google search.  A Summon search will typically deliver many, many results.  The key to success is to utilize the filters located in the margin to the left of your Summon search results.
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You can easily locate e-books using the refinement filters within Summon.  Conduct your Summon search, refine your search to "items with full text online" and limit the content type to "Books/ebook".  Your list of results will now be only e-books.

Recommended FullText Databases

These databases are good for general background about WWII, eugenics, and the Holocaust. If you expand your search to use the term disability and WWII, you will have more success, as there are few sources related to the Deaf population.

Article Samples from Databases

Rogow, Sally M. "Child Victims in Nazi Germany." The Journal of Holocaust Education 8.3 (Winter 1999): 7187.
During the Nazi years, thousands of non Jewish German children were victims of unrelenting persecution and genocide. Children who were blind, deaf, physically disabled or mentally handicapped,orphans, juvenile delinquents and adolescent nonconformists were removed from their homes and communities, isolated in institutions and work camps and many thousands were murdered. Significant members of the medical profession found it personally and professionally profitableto engage in murder and gave it a protective veneer of respectability. In the process Europe's mostadvanced and comprehensive system of rehabilitative education was destroyed. This article, entirely based on secondary literature, provides a concise synthesis of this history for teachers.

Ryan, Donna F. "Deaf People in Hitler's Europe: Conducting Oral History Interviews With Deaf Holocaust Survivors." The Public Historian 27.2 (Apr. 2005): 4352.

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Check to see if we have the full text of your item whenever you see the MORE button! If a copy is not automatically found, an option to submit an order for the full text will appear! Click the button now to see what happens!

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